COVID-19 vaccines: getting your second dose

Learn when and where you can book an appointment for your second dose of the covid 19 vaccines.

This page will be updated regularly. Last updated: September 14, 2021

Proof of vaccination

As of September 22, 2021, you will need to provide proof of vaccination to access certain businesses and settings. Read the proof of vaccination guidance for businesses (PDF).

If you still need your first or second dose of the vaccine, book now.

Accelerating second doses

A stable and reliable supply of covid 19 vaccines has allowed the province to quickly expand eligibility and access to Ontarians to receive the vaccine ahead of schedule, providing a strong level of protection against the virus.

Your appointment for your second dose must be at least:

  • 8 weeks after your first dose of AstraZeneca with informed consent
  • 28 days after your first dose of Moderna or Pfizer

Timing of second dose appointments may vary based on local considerations and the date of your first dose appointment. Learn when you can book an appointment.

Which vaccine you can get

All Health Canada approved vaccines provide strong protection against covid 19 and its variants, including the Delta variant.

Vaccines can be safely mixed for a first and second dose. To ensure maximum protection, you are encouraged to get vaccinated as soon as you can and to receive your second dose within the recommended interval.

If your first dose was:

  • AstraZeneca: you can get AstraZeneca, Moderna, or Pfizer for your second dose, at least 8 weeks after your first dose with informed consent.
  • Moderna or Pfizer: you can get either Moderna or Pfizer for your second dose at least 28 days after your first dose. You can switch between Moderna and Pfizer safely.

All of these options for your second dose:

  • are safe
  • provide strong protection against covid 19, including the Delta variant
  • will count as a completed series (you will be fully vaccinated)

For more information, read our safe and effective second dose fact sheet.

When you can book an appointment

Second dose appointments will be based on the timing of your first dose.

If your first dose was Pfizer or Moderna

You can get your second dose at least 28 days after your first dose.

If your first dose was AstraZeneca

If your first dose was the AstraZeneca vaccine, for your second dose you can choose to receive either:

  • a second dose of AstraZeneca
  • one of the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer or Moderna)

You can get a second dose of AstraZeneca:

  • at least 8 weeks after your first dose with informed consent
  • at a participating pharmacy or primary care setting

You can book one of the mRNA vaccines:

  • at least 8 weeks after your first dose of AstraZeneca with informed consent
  • through:
    • the provincial booking system
    • a participating pharmacy or primary care setting
    • public health units that use their own booking system

Where to get it and how to book an appointment

You may book your second at the same place you got your first dose, or you can book it at a different site or channel (even if you already have a second appointment booked).

Not all clinic types are available in every region and depend on local planning done by each public health unit.

Mass immunization clinic

In most cases, if you booked your first dose at a mass immunization clinic, your second dose was automatically scheduled 16 weeks after your first.

You can rebook your appointment:

Second doses can also be booked without a first appointment through the provincial booking system.

Pop-up or mobile clinic

If you already have an appointment booked at the pop-up location where you received your first dose, you will also have the option of booking a second dose at another mobile clinic or through another channel.

More information will follow on how and when second dose booking and rebooking will be available.

Hospital clinic

Visit your local hospital or public health unit website for booking details, if available in your region.

Pharmacy or primary care provider

You are encouraged to contact the pharmacy or primary care provider where you received your first dose. You may also find a different participating pharmacy to book an appointment, when you are eligible.

Primary care settings and pharmacies may also be reaching out to eligible Ontarians to accelerate appointments for second doses.

Third doses for those who are at the highest risk

We are offering third doses of covid 19 vaccines to select vulnerable populations.

You may be able to get a third dose 8 weeks after your second dose if you are:

  • a transplant recipient (including solid organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplants)
  • receiving stable, active treatment (chemotherapy, targeted therapies, immunotherapy) for a malignant hematologic disorder
  • receiving an anti-CD20 agent (for example, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab)

Your health care provider will contact you.

You may be able to get a third dose 5 months after your second dose if you are:

  • living in a high-risk congregate setting, such as a long-term care home, high-risk retirement home or First Nations elder care lodge

Public health units will work with the homes to give you your short within your home or at a mobile clinic.

Registering your vaccination

If you received your first dose or both doses of the covid 19 vaccine outside of Ontario or Canada, you can register your vaccination by contacting your local public health unit (PHU).

If you received only your first dose, you:

  • must provide proof, such as an immunization record or a proof of vaccination certificate to your PHU to be registered in the system
  • can book your second dose through:

Your second dose appointment will be booked with the appropriate second dose interval.

If you received both doses, you only have to provide proof of vaccination to your PHU. No other action is needed.

Why you should register your vaccination

If you get a covid 19 vaccine outside of Ontario or Canada, you should register it so you can:

  • book a second dose (if needed) in Ontario
  • be contacted if there is any clinical guidance about the vaccine you got
  • provide proof of vaccination if it’s required by certain settings
  • easily access a copy or your vaccine receipt if you lose your original one

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